Empowering Women… To Murder

There are many differences between the sexes. Beyond the biological, there are statistically significant differences between the jobs men and women take and associated pay. It is even more true about delivering death, whether in murder, suicide rates or enlisting in the armed forces.

Armed Services

The enlistment in armed forces in many cases is a function of the traditional roles of women being maintained in countries around the world. Years ago, when weapons of war were not as sophisticated as today, physical strength was imperative. However, today there is no particular advantage to raw power when flying a fighter jet. Technology has leveled the field between men and women.

In the United States Armed Forces, women constitute roughly 16 percent of the fighting force and 18% of the officers. The highest percentages are in the Air Force and Navy where they account for nearly 25% of the officers, while making up only 10% in the Marines.

In Israel, women make up roughly 20% of the standing army. While Israel remains the only country where national service is compulsory for women, they are allowed to take a variety of roles to strengthen society not involved in combat. The Israeli national service called Sherut Leumi remains very popular among women, while men not who don’t enter combat units more typically go into intelligence or logistical roles in the army.

Suicide

In the U.S., suicide rates among men are 3 to 6 times the rate of women for every age group. In 2017, there were more than twice the number of suicides (47,173) than homicides (19,510) and it is the second leading cause of death among people aged 10 to 34 years old.

Women are actually more likely to attempt suicide but choose less violent and effective methods than men who often use guns. Approximately one-third of U.S. men own guns while only 12% of women do and its higher ownership rate among men may account for some of the disparity in suicide rates between the sexes. Overall, firearms account for half of all suicides.

Murder

Unlike the armed services or suicide, murder is the deliberate taking of another civilian life. It is viewed as the most heinous crimes around the world.

In the U.S., women commit roughly 15% of the murders even though they account for half of the population. Women killed an intimate partner or family member in approximately 60% of cases, while men killed non-family members in 80% of their murders. As victims, women were more than twice as likely to be killed by a spouse or intimate acquaintance than a stranger.

The statistics are clear: men are more violent and commit many more murders than women, especially of strangers.

Empowering Women… To Murder

The subject of “women empowerment” is often used around the world. In some countries like Saudi Arabia, women lack basic rights like leaving the house without a male consent or driving a car. In other countries women can’t vote or work in certain professions. The more liberal countries would like to see such policies change and women achieve more rights and equality with men.

But not in murder. Most civil societies do not want to see their young girls grow up to murder innocent civilians the way that men do.

Most places are not the Palestinian Authority (PA) territories.

The Palestinian Women’s Affairs Technical Committee (WATC) is based in Ramallah, down the road from the headquarters of the PA. It’s stated mission and goals are to empower women, to develop their skills and competencies and erase stereotypes about women’s roles in society. On its surface, these seem noble goals, until one applies the competencies to the murder of children.

On May 15, 2017, the WATC helped open a new women’s center in the Samarian town of Burqa, near Nablus. They opted to name the center the Dalal al-Mugrahbi Women’s Center, named for a terrorist who killed 37 Israeli civilians, including 12 children in the infamous Coastal Road Massacre in 1978.


Palestinians inaugurate a square to commemorate Dalal Mughrabi, a Palestinian terrorist who killed dozens of Israeli civilians in a 1978 bus hijacking in Israel, seen in portrait, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, on March 13, 2011.
(AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

It was reported that at the center’s inauguration ceremony, Rim Haja, a member of the Burqa village council, said the center would focus on the history of the struggle of the shaheed (martyr) Dalal al-Mughrabi and on presenting her “heritage” to youth groups. She added that naming the center for Dalal al-Mughrabi led the way for other “enrichment activities” dealing with the history of the Palestinian “struggle.”

When news of naming the square after a terrorist got out, various sponsors began to withdraw their support, including the government of Norway and the United Nations which said it “disassociated itself from the Center once it learned the offensive name chosen for it and will take measures to ensure that such incidents do not take place in the future.

The head of the official PA-owned news outlet Wafa, Sami Daghlas said that “the center has no intention of caving in to the pressure and changing its name,” and will continue on its mission “to serve and empower young women in the village and to help them develop them to become active members in society.” The question is of course, “active” in what way?

Over the following months, additional agencies and governments withdrew their funding support. When the European Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law Secretariat, a joint donor program sponsored by Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland, pulled support from the WATC for its support in the center, Samia Bamya, the chairperson of WATC issued a statement:

“Despite the damage resulting from the cessation of funding, we will never make concessions as far as our principles and national and community role are concerned for the sake of receiving conditional funding.”

Amira Haroun, the undersecretary of the Palestinian Ministry of Women’s Affairs added her own thoughts to the defunding of the WATC stating:

“All of the women institutions working in the Palestinian territories are acting in accordance with Palestinian national strategies that support the Palestinian cause and preserve the history of our struggling people. Therefore, any foreign funding that does not go in tandem with these objectives is refused… Claims whereby reviving the names of our fighters by naming Palestinian centers, squares and streets after them fall under the category of incitement to violence. They are false claims and a distortion of the truth. Israel is the one inciting countries against us and killing our people continuously.”

It is part of an ongoing travesty in which Palestinians name schools and camps after the killers of children and teach the youth to emulate the murderers. Using terrorists as role models is a crime against humanity.

While much of the world seeks to empower young women to achieve equality in education, career opportunities and freedom, the Palestinians seek to empower their young women to become murderers of Israeli children.


Related First.One.Through articles:

The UN Never Demands Justice for Palestinian Killers

Paying to Murder Jews: From Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Iran to the Palestinian Authority

Reviewing the Rhetoric of Palestinian Arabs and Israelis

The Proud Fathers of Palestinian Terrorists

The UN Fails on its Own Measures to address the Conditions Conducive to the Spread of Terrorism

UN Concern is only for Violence in “Occupied Palestinian Territory,” not Israel

The Palestinians aren’t “Resorting to Violence”; They are Murdering and Waging War

Muslim Women Debate Anti-Semitism

The UN Hates Israel More Than it Cares About Women

“Occupation”-Washing Honor Killings

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