Juneteenth and the Deceptive Hustle

June 19, 1865 was the day that slavery came to an end in Texas and generally marks the end of the abominable practice in the Confederate States. While President Lincoln may have emancipated the slaves on January 1, 1863, a bloody civil war would have to be fought for another two and a half years for black people to gain their freedom.

The black slaves had their lives, property, work product and dignity stolen from them, and their descendants came to the U.S. Congress on June 19, 2019 to ask for reparations from the United States. It is a claim that is appropriate and just. History is clear about the crime and consideration must be given.

Actor Danny Glover, right, and author Ta-Nehisi Coates, left, testify about reparation for the descendants of slaves during a hearing before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Various speakers on different platforms argued that the period of injustice continued well past 1865, as laws remained which kept black people from obtaining citizenship, the right to vote, to receive a proper education and ability to work freely, and as such, the reparations must cover this time frame as well. There is some truth to these arguments although not as clear cut as the situation regarding slavery. Should every child who ever received a bad education (or their descendants) be allowed to sue the government? Are all descendants of women who also didn’t have the right to vote entitled to compensation?

The recitations of wrongdoings kept coming, and the arguments became even more tenuous.

Talking heads with lofty titles argued that slavery exists today in the form of the mass incarceration and home foreclosures among black people, as well as the income gap and wealth gap between black people and white people. They argue that these modern day forms of slavery and injustice which must also be addressed through similar mechanisms of reparations.

This is a dangerous and slippery slope of blending real and perceived rights.

Prison reform is an important issue worth reviewing. Whether the government should forgive and wipe clean the arrest records for minor crimes must be discussed, and there is seemingly no question that such matter has impacted the black community disproportionately. But the laws were made for all Americans to benefit all Americans. There was no malice targeting the entire black community.

Home foreclosures was a matter of individuals, of all backgrounds, not paying their mortgages to financial institutions. These were transactions between homeowners and banks, not governmental laws prejudicing a segment of society. U.S. taxpayers should not provide any compensation to any single segment of the population because of personal financial matters. To fold this unfortunate situation into the discussion of slavery is absurd.

Lastly, the inequality of outcomes regarding income and wealth are byproducts of thousands of variables, including education, location, vocation and marital status. An equality of outcome is not a right, regardless of how many times the alt-left demands. If there are issues regarding the causes of income or wealth inequality based on race, then those are the only items which should be reviewed, and such consideration in no way means that there must be cash compensation offered to the black community. For example, imagine the black community sues the U.S. government in the future because of the disproportionate number of abortions which black women have, thereby reducing the black population and proportionate power. That’s an outcome which results from the choices made by black people, not one mandated by the government.

Reparations for the U.S. government’s crime of slavery is a worthwhile point to consider but it has become entangled in the current commentary about income and wealth inequality. It is a deceptive hustle to broaden the discussion and fatten the greenback pie, but ultimately undermines the legitimacy of the Juneteenth discussions.


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2 thoughts on “Juneteenth and the Deceptive Hustle

  1. ***** QUICK QUOTES ABOUT ARABS AND
    MUSLIMS PRACTICING SLAVERY *****

    Thomas Jefferson (3rd President of the USA) is condemned
    for owning slaves by: Liberals, Leftists, Progressives, and Socialists.

    But amazingly, Mohamed, the founder of Islam,
    is NEVER criticized for owning dozens of slaves!

    ===================
    QUOTE 1 OF 7:

    “Although slavery had been outlawed in Britain and the importation of slaves was illegal in the United States, an active slave trade continued between Africa and the Arab nations.”

    SOURCE: South Africa: 1880 to the Present (chapter 3, page 44) by Bruce and Becky Durost Fish, 2001 CE, Chelsea House Publishers, Philadelphia, ISBN 0-7910-5676-7.

    ===================
    QUOTE 2 OF 7:

    “Moreover, the ability of the Arabs to pay depended on their success as slave hunters.”

    SOURCE: The River War (chapter 1, page 7) by Winston Churchill, year 1899

    ===================
    QUOTE 3 OF 7:

    Foremost of the leaders of the revolt [in Sudan around year 1884] were the Arab slave dealers, furious at the attempted suppression of their trade.

    SOURCE: The River War (chapter 2, page 27) by Winston Churchill, year 1899 CE

    ===================
    QUOTE 4 OF 7:

    “Slavery was a flourishing institution in Arabia in the 1920s, and for several decades thereafter. It was not formally abolished in the Kingdom until 1962. The pilgrimage was the main source. Nigerians and Sudanese would sell their children in Mecca to help pay for their journey home, and the slave trade was one traditional source of the shareefs’ wealth.”

    “In Nejd every emir and sheikh had at least one black family living in his household, and their children were assigned as playmates to the children in the household of their age and sex, growing up with them and often becoming their close companions in adult life.”

    “When Prince Faisal ibn Abdul Aziz visited New York [City] in [year] 1944 [CE], the management of the Waldorf Astoria [hotel] were shocked that he brought his slave Merzouk with him.”

    SOURCE: The Kingdom: Arabia and the House of Sa’ud
    (chapter 22, page 177) by Robert Lacey, published in year 1981 by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York, ISBN-10: 0006365094 ISBN-13: 978-0006365099

    ===================
    QUOTE 5 OF 7:

    “The government [of Saudi Arabia] hurriedly purchased the freedom of 4,000-or-so slaves in the kingdom [of Saudi Arabia] for £1,000 each, more than three-times the going rate-per-head in the Buraymi market, and shrugged-off questions as to why, at every UN debate on the subject up until the autumn of [year] 1962, Sa’udi delegates had strenuously denied the existence of any slavery in their country.”
    SOURCE: The Kingdom: Arabia and the House of Sa’ud
    (chapter 37, page 345) by Robert Lacey, published in 1981 by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York, ISBN-10: 0006365094 ISBN-13: 978-0006365099

    ===================
    QUOTE 6 OF 7:
    “The missionaries were particularly appalled by the slave trade in Africa. Although slavery had been outlawed in Britain and the importation of slaves was illegal in the United States, an active slave trade continued between Africa and the Arab nations. The missionaries wanted to create other commercial ventures so that Africans could make a living without being dependent on this odious system.”

    SOURCE: South Africa: 1880 to the Present (chapter 3, page 44) by Bruce and Becky Durost Fish, year 2001 CE, Chelsea House Publishers, Philadelphia, http://www.ChelseaHouse.com ISBN 0-7910-5676-7

    ===================
    QUOTE 7 OF 7:
    Brigitte Gabriel said:
    “Mohammed himself owned dozens of slaves. His followers continue to do so today.”

    SOURCE: They Must Be Stopped: Why We Must Defeat Radical Islam and How We Can Do It (chapter 9, page 183) by Brigitte Gabriel, year 2008, year 2010, St. Martin’s Press, 288 pages, ISBN 0312571283, ISBN 9780312571283.

    http://tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/books/137476/slave-trade-black-muslim

    Like

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